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Recent accomplishments of CDFW's scientific community


CDFW Documents Statewide Impact of Recent Drought on Fish and Aquatic Species

Collage of three different images. Top image is rocky, barren dirt area in front of small lake amongst trees and mountains. Bottom left photo is two women on rocks in front of water and large walls of rock. Bottom right photo shows three people pulling and pushing metal boat over shallow riverbed with trees in background.
One silver lining to emerge from the severe drought that impacted California earlier this decade was that it whetted an appetite to study the event and compile data designed to help fish and aquatic species better weather future droughts.

Sierra Nevada Bighorn: A 21st Century Wildlife Success Story

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Seven animals. Can just seven Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep really make much of an impact on the species’ future? CDFW scientists believe so, which is why they came away pleased with the results of their annual spring helicopter capture this past March.

California Native Plant Week

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California hosts approximately 6,500 different kinds of plants that occur naturally in the state, and many of these are found nowhere else in the world. Some of these plants are so rare or have been so impacted by human influence that they are at risk of permanent extinction from the wild and have been protected by state and federal laws. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) Native Plant Program is developing and implementing standardized and repeatable monitoring plans for ten state and federally listed plant species on nine CDFW Ecological Reserves throughout the state. This work is funded by a federal grant awarded in 2015.