Science Spotlight

Science Institute News

rss

Recent accomplishments of CDFW's scientific community


Succulent Plants Returned to the Cliffs from Where They Were Poached

Specify Alternate Text
Last week, a team of California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) staff and volunteers spent hours working to replant more than 2,000 Dudleya succulents that were seized after a poaching investigation. The plants were meticulously returned to the Mendocino and Humboldt county cliffs from where they were stolen weeks before.

Sweetwater River Habitat Restoration

Specify Alternate Text
California’s drought emergency was officially declared to be over last year, but its deleterious impact on fish habitat is still being felt in many parts of the state -- especially in arid parts of Southern California. In order to help offset these effects at one site in northern San Diego County, CDFW biologists and other staff recently toiled to create spawning beds for rainbow trout.

CDFW Unveils New Tool Allowing Public to Report Seeing Tule (And Other) Elk

Specify Alternate Text
CDFW wants to know if, when and where you’ve seen an elk in California – and they’ve just created a new online reporting tool that makes it easy for members of the public to share this information.

Creating Habitat in a Drawn-Down Lake

Specify Alternate Text
More than a decade ago, Southern California freshwater anglers were disappointed to see a tried-and-true fishing spot dramatically affected by an emergency lake drawdown. Due to seismic concerns with the Perris Dam, California Department of Water Resources (DWR) officials deemed it necessary to reduce the water level at Lake Perris near Riverside by several thousands of acre-feet.

California Fish and Game, Issue 103(4)

Specify Alternate Text
The latest issue of California Fish and Game, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s scientific journal, is now available online! Issue 103(4) features articles that add to the knowledge base for three marine species, all of which face potential threats from overharvesting, incidental take and loss of habitat: Thorny stingray, Chinook salmon and green abalone.