Science Spotlight

Science Institute News

rss

Recent accomplishments of CDFW's scientific community


CDFW’s Science Institute: Providing Our Scientists with the Tools for Success

Large butterfly with orange and black with white spots on wings and a black and white spotted body with dirt and blue sky in background.
CDFW is a department with about 1,200 employees in scientific classifications, spread from Yreka in the north to Blythe in the southeast. Their expertise spans a broad spectrum of subjects – wildlife management, fisheries management, marine issues, habitat conservation and restoration, veterinary science, pathology, genetics, invasive species and so much more.

New research shows climate change may harm migratory songbirds

Hermit Thrush perched on a tree branch. Long-distance Neotropical migrants like the Hermit Thrush may be more vulnerable to climate change than other types of songbirds.
New research by CDFW Wildlife Ecologist Dr. Brett Furnas shows that Neotropical migrant songbirds are shifting their summer ranges to higher elevations in response to climate change.

For 21 Years, Volunteer Has Kept Tabs on Morro Bay’s Black Brant

Specify Alternate Text
John Roser began hearing the stories shortly after he moved to Los Osos, San Luis Obispo County, on the shores of Morro Bay in the mid-1990s.

Study of Songbirds’ Calls Provides Important Climate Insight

Specify Alternate Text
Two avian researchers recently completed a groundbreaking study on the effects of climate change, based on the calls of California’s songbirds. By recording the sounds made by eight different songbird species, and tracking the dates they are most vocal and how frequently they sing, the scientists were able to develop a method to measure how the birds are adjusting to climate change.