Science Spotlight

Science Institute News

rss

Recent accomplishments of CDFW's scientific community


2018 Waterfowl Breeding Population Survey Shows Continuing Upward Trend

Duck in flight
The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) has completed its 2018 waterfowl breeding population survey -- and it’s good news for hunters and birdwatchers alike, as the total waterfowl population in the state now tops out at over a half million, for the first time in six years.

On the Trail of the Mysterious Sierra Nevada Red Fox

Specify Alternate Text
The Sierra Nevada red fox has been the subject of intensified study by CDFW over the past decade. As they are notoriously tough to track and even tougher to trap, there are many unanswered questions regarding this elusive animal.

CDFW Gets a Jump on Preserving Sierra Nevada Yellow-legged Frogs

Specify Alternate Text
It does not take a leap of faith to believe that CDFW scientists have gained the upper hand in bolstering the population of yellow-legged frogs in the High Sierra.

California Fish and Game, Volume 103, Issue 3

Specify Alternate Text
The latest issue of California Fish and Game, 103-3, makes a significant contribution to the body of research related to longfin smelt in California. A paper titled, “Historic and contemporary distribution of Longfin Smelt (Spirinchus thaleichthys) along the California coast” analyzes and presents observation data for this species from a variety of published and unpublished sources dating from 1889 to 2016.

The Challenges of Studying Roosevelt Elk

Specify Alternate Text
For residents of Humboldt and Del Norte counties, the majestic Roosevelt elk is a common sight. Although Roosevelt numbers were dwindling in California by the 1920s, conservative management strategies and limited hunting opportunities have helped them to rebound. Today, researchers have identified more than 20 distinct groups of elk in these two counties, many of which consist of well over 50 animals.

Saving California’s White Abalone

Specify Alternate Text
California’s coastal waters are home to seven species of abalone, and all but one are endangered or listed as species of special concern. The white abalone in particular has been nearly decimated by overfishing and disease, and scientists can find no evidence that the remaining population is reproducing in the wild.