Science Spotlight

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Recent accomplishments of CDFW's scientific community


Iron Gate Hatchery

Short-haired woman in yellow rain jacket and black gloves holding fish on side of metal basin along side man in yellow rain jacket, black gloves, and camo hat holding fish over metal basin as dark orange liquid streams out of fish into metal basin.
At Iron Gate Hatchery in Hornbrook, the fall 2018 spawning operation has just concluded. Iron Gate spawns both Fall-Run Chinook Salmon and Coho Salmon from the Klamath River. For Chinook, the hatchery staff manually collect the eggs and mix it with the milt immediately after the fish come into the facility.

Science Spotlight: CDFW’s Annual Egg Take Results in Big Haul on the Little Truckee River

Woman wearing brown beanie cap, black puffy vest, flannel shirt, and camo waders standing in streambed holding a salmon
Each October, conditions permitting, CDFW staff and volunteers from the California Inland Fisheries Foundation, Inc. and Kokanee Power descend on the Little Truckee River, just upstream from Stampede Reservoir near Truckee, and get to work on the annual Kokanee Egg Take.

Science Spotlight: It’s Spawning Season for Salmon, Scientists Trying to Revive Extinct Central Valley Salmon Run

Man wearing long sleeved khaki shirt and pants with CDFW logo as well as yellow reflective vest and green safety hat while holding upside down fish. Scale made of PVC pipe and monitor in background.
Fresno County may seem an unlikely setting for salmon restoration and research, but some of the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) most ambitious work with salmon anywhere is taking place in the heart of the parched Central Valley.

California Fish and Game, Issue 103(4)

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The latest issue of California Fish and Game, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s scientific journal, is now available online! Issue 103(4) features articles that add to the knowledge base for three marine species, all of which face potential threats from overharvesting, incidental take and loss of habitat: Thorny stingray, Chinook salmon and green abalone.

Going with the Flow: CDFW’s Water Branch Keeps a Careful Eye on California’s Riverine Resources

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Taking care of California’s fish and wildlife wouldn’t be possible without managing the resources upon which they depend. To that end, CDFW has an entire branch – and many scientific staff – dedicated to the scientific study, and planning and management of water resources.

One Step Closer to Reestablishing a New Population of Endangered Winter Run Salmon

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Habitat is the key to the long-term survival of Sacramento River winter-run Chinook in California. Since 1999, CDFW has been working with multiple agencies and private parties on planning efforts to restore the population of these endangered salmon. More than $100 million has been allocated to specific habitat restoration work on Battle Creek, which comprises approximately 48 miles of prime salmon and steelhead habitat.

CDFW Implants Transponders into Spring-Run Chinook

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On Thursday, May 18, fisheries biologists implanted acoustic transponders into 60 endangered adult spring-run Chinook salmon. The transponders will track their movements and help determine spawning success later this season. The salmon will be released to spawn naturally in the San Joaquin River near Friant over the next three months.

Surveying the Sacramento River and Delta

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How CDFW uses a combination of scientific techniques to better understand fish populations and the general health of Northern California waterways. (video)