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New CDFW Research Boat Joins the Fleet

New CDFW Research Boat Joins the Fleet

steel bow and foredeck of a research trawler (boat)
Interior pilot's seat on a 32-foot boat vessel
A winch on the afterdeck of 32-foot boat
skipper's controls in a 32-foot research vessel

Recently at Bay Marine Boatworks in Richmond, CDFW’s Bay Delta Region accepted delivery of a new research boat. Funded by the California Department of Water Resources and the United States Bureau of Reclamation, the 32-foot-long aluminum boat is now part of the fleet dedicated to collecting data for the Interagency Ecological Program (IEP), a consortium of state and federal agencies that have been working together on ecological investigations since the 1970s.

Berthed in Antioch, the boat will be named after a native fish or aquatic invertebrate, and will be christened later this summer. It will be put into service for field work (trawls) mandated for the protection of endangered fishes — especially Delta Smelt and Longfin Smelt — in accordance with state and federal water projects.

The yet-unnamed boat was built and rigged for CDFW specifically to meet the needs of research in the Delta. It features a very sturdy hull and an emphasis on “trawl hydraulics.” Built by Munson in Burlington, Washington, the bright gray boat has a top speed of 25 miles per hour and can carry 4,500 pounds (combined crew and cargo). It has a 10-foot beam (width) that will allow the crew to work safely, and uses two trawl winches for towing nets far behind the boat. The boat’s 473-hp diesel engine uses a special ‘trolling valve’ to tow nets at just one mile per hour. The slow speed is crucial because the nets have very fine mesh designed to catch very small fish.

The vessel is the first new boat that Bay Delta Region's IEP Operations Program has received in 13 years. To avoid increasing the number of boats in the fleet, it replaces a 1995-vintage boat that was far smaller (16 feet) and relegates the Beowulf — a notoriously unreliable 1989-vintage 25-foot trawler with no toilet and very little seating — to the status of back-up boat.

“Water-based science is an essential function for this department, and our biologists put in many long hours on these boats. Their safety is imperative,” said Marty Gingras, IEP program manager. “This new vessel is versatile, cost-efficient, safe and green – and it will play a very important role in our efforts to manage threatened and endangered fish populations in the Delta for years to come.”

Eventually, CDFW hopes to replace other boats in the fleet, including the 50-year-old Striper II, which scientific crews use for striped bass and sturgeon surveys.



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